Area Village Index
East Blatchington

Hailsham
go back to the Previous Page

 

 
Advertising Rates - Free Business Listing
Our Whats On
WhatsOn in  all our Areas
Guides to the Area
Suggested Guides to the Area
Where to Stay
Bed & Breakfast
Book your Bed & Breakfast
Book your Bed & Breakfast
Hotels
Book your Hotel
Best Western near
VillageNet-i
HouseSales
Businesses(249)
Accomodation(25)
Amenities(42)
Whats On in West Kent & East Sussex(356)
Why not register for our Whats On Email for Kent and Sussex

Other Pages
Local Attractions
History of the area
Reference to unusual objects
Famous People
Walks in our Area
Our Recipe Pages
 
VillageNet
Kent & Sussex Village name Derivation
For the villages and towns that VillageNet covers in Kent and East Sussex
these pages shows the origination or derivation of the place names.

Bodiam -to- Buxted
Bodiam Bodiam appears to be derived from the Anglo Saxon Bodan Hamm (Bodan's water meadow). In the Domesday book of 1086 it was recorded as Bodeham and in the thirteenth century as Bodihamme.

Bodle Street Bodle Street derives from the Bothel family who were landowners in the fourteenth century. In the sixteenth century it was recorded as Bodylstret and then Bodell Strete.

Bonnington Bonnington is derived from the Anglo Saxon Buna tun(Buna’s homestead), appearing in the Domesday Book as Bonintone.

Boreham Street Boreham Street is possibly derived from the Anglo Saxon Beorgh Hamme (the village on the hill) or Boar Hamme (Boar enclosure) and Street from the Roman street possibly because there was a main Roman road from Lewes to Beauport Park at Hastings.

Borough Green
Borough Green is derived from the Anglo Saxon, and has two possibilities it could have derived from Burh Grene (the green stronghold) but it is more likely derived from Beorg Grene (the green hill).

Boughton Monchelsea The name is derived from the Anglo Saxon Boc Tun(Beech Tree settlement) the suffix Monchelsea was added by the Montchensie family in the thirteenth century. The village is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Boltone, then Bouton , Bocton , and probably via Bocton de Montchensie to the current Boughton Monchelsea. The suffix using the family name seems to be added mostly in this area of Kent, possibly to differentiate multiple Boctun's.

Brasted Brasted has its derivation from the Anglo Saxon Braed Stede(Broad Place/Town). In the Domesday book it is recorded as Briestede and Bradesteda in the Textus Roffensis from 1125AD.

Brede Brede is most likely derived from the Anglo Saxon Braed(Broad) which described the sea estuary towards Westfield . The village is first mentioned in a charter from the time of King Canute (1016 - 1035). It is possible that the name came from the 'Brid' family who were masters of the mint at Hastings, but this is less likely. The mint was founded by King Aethelstan in 924.

Brenchley The name derives from the Anglo-Saxons who had a settlement in the area. The leader was named Braenca, and his people who were pig hearders lived in a clearing or 'leagh' in the forest of Anderida hence Braenca's Leagh. This has varied through the centuries to Braencsle, Brencheslega, Branchelegh, Brenchesle and finally to Brenchley.

Brenzett Brenzett is derived from the Anglo Saxon Brenning saet(Burning Camp or crematorium) the village is first mentioned in the Domesday Book as Brensete.

Brightling This village is a Saxon village one of the first to be settled by Haesta around 475 AD.

Brightling is derived from Beorht(Full View) or Beorgh(Hill) el(people) ing(fort or stronghold) so it translates into either 'The Hill peoples fort' or 'The Full View peoples Fort' probably due to the commanding view available at the top of the hill. Initially it was probably just Beorghing or Beorhting meaning Hill Fort or Full View Fort as most of these ings were initially strategic defensive positions, the village was probably founded behind the hill after the area became controlled by the Saxons .

The place names ending in ing,inge or ings were usually found on higher ground, or in places which control strategic points, and appear to surround areas first settled by the Saxons.

Broad Oak Broad Oak is most likely derived from a Broad Oak that was a landmark in the area.

Broad Oak Brede Broad Oak is most likely derived from a Broad Oak that was a landmark in the area.

Brookland Brookland can be derived it three ways from the Anglo Saxon Broc Land (the land where a spring is - probably unlikely as this area would have been at Sea Level at the time) or (The land of illness - probably the right explanation as the area would have been damp and flooded for much of the time) or finally (the land of the badger). It was first recorded in 1262 as Broklande as part of an innings in the marshland.

Broomhill The name means Broom Hill (Gorse Hill) , a hill for the marsh area would only have been a few metres above sea level. The village or small town was a major fishing port in the area and has been known as Bromehill , Proomhill or Promehill .

Burmarsh Burmarsh is thought to be derived from the early Anglo Saxon(about 700AD) Burhwaramersc meaning the fortress dwellers in the marsh , probably a stockade but could have been a defensive position on the coast as it was then.

Burwash Burwash which could be derived from Burh aesc (the ash fortress), but a more likely explanation is beorg aesc (ashes hill), it has changed over the years to Burhersce twelfth century, Burgasshe in the fourteenth century, then to Burgherssh and finally Burwash.

Burwash Common This would have been the Common land attached to Burwash which could be derived from Burh aesc (the ash fortress), but a more likely explanation is beorg aesc (ashes hill), it has changed over the years to Burhersce twelfth century, Burgasshe in the fourteenth century, then to Burgherssh and finally Burwash.

Burwash Weald This would have been wooded land from the forest of Andredsweald attached to Burwash which could be derived from Burh aesc (the ash fortress), but a more likely explanation is beorg aesc (ashes hill), it has changed over the years to Burhersce twelfth century, Burgasshe in the fourteenth century, then to Burgherssh and finally Burwash.

Buxted Buxted is most likely derived from the Anglo Saxon boc stede (beech place), the spelling changed to Boxstede in the thirteenth century and Buksted in the fourteenth century.


Top of Page © VillageNet.co.uk 1998-2014
If you have any information, or comments on our site,
 please E-Mail info@villagenet.co.uk
since 1998

 
Buy or Sell your property here Why not advertise your event for free
Local Businesses
Richard Vobes
Ella Clarke
Tenderheart
Advertise in this space
format is a picture
200 x 150 pixels
With a link to your Website or Email address
for details Pricing Here