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VillageNet
Kent & Sussex Village name Derivation
For the villages and towns that VillageNet covers in Kent and East Sussex
these pages shows the origination or derivation of the place names.

Upper & Lower Dicker -to- Windmill Hill
Upper & Lower Dicker It is believed that the Dickers, both Upper and Lower were named after an old Sussex term for bartering to dicker, as traders set up stalls along the A22 to sell to travellers.

Vines Cross This village derivation is still being researched

Wadhurst The name Wadhurst means 'Wada's settlement in the clearing in a wood, and dates the parish to Anglo Saxon times.

Waldron Waldron is derived from the Anglo Saxon 'Weald aern' meaning house in the wood.

Warbleton Warbleton is an Anglo Saxon 'Waerborge tun' meaning the homestead of the Waerborge family.

Warehorne Warehorne is again an Anglo Saxon village from 'Wear Horna' meaning the wier on the river bend.

Wartling This village is a Saxon village one of the first to be settled by Haesta around 475AD.

Wartling is derived from Waeta(marsh) el(people) ing(fort or stronghold) so it translates to the Marsh peoples Fort. Initially it was probably just Waetaing meaning Marsh Fort as most of these ings were initially strategic defensive positions, with the villages being founded after the area became controlled by the Saxons .

The place names ending in ing,inge or ings were usually found on higher ground, or in places which control strategic points, and appear to surround areas first settled by the Saxons.

West Dean Westdean is an old Anglo Saxon name meaning the West Valley possibly showing the Western extent of Alfred the Great's manor called Dene (the valley). It is recorded in the Domesday book of 1086 as Dene.

West Farleigh This village derivation is still being researched

West Malling This village derivation is still being researched

West Peckham This village derivation is still being researched

Westerham This village derivation is still being researched

Westfield This village derivation is still being researched

Westham Its name comes from the Anglo Saxon ham meaning enclosure, and translates to the 'West enclosure' probably of the Castle.



Westmeston westmeston

Whatlington Whatlington is one of those Saxon fortified hill villages settled by Haesta around 475AD .

The name is derived from either Hwata(the earth goddess) or Hwaet(wheat) and el(people) ington(fortified village on a hill) so becomes either 'The Earth Goddess peoples fortified village on the hill' or 'The Wheat peoples fortified village on the hill' - it would probably be the latter as most early Saxon settlements seem to be named after the use of the village.

The place names ending in ington or ingham appear to be the second Saxon settlements after the (ing,inge or ings) and appear to be fortified villages either on a hill(ington) or in river valley(ingham)

Wilmington Wilmington is one of those Saxon fortified hill villages probably settled by Aelle after 477AD .

The name is derived from Wylm(cloud) ington(fortified village on a hill) so becomes 'The Cloudy fortified village on the hill' originally these ingtons were located at the top of the hills as defensive positions but moved lower down into the more productive lowlands once the area was under Saxon control.

The place names ending in ington or ingham appear to be the second Saxon settlements after the (ing,inge or ings) and appear to be fortified villages either on a hill(ington) or in river valley(ingham)

Winchelsea Old Winchelsea , originally known as Wincles eg (Winkle Island) , was found on an island between what is now known as Rye Harbour and Winchelsea Beach .
An extract of the Nothgyth Quest whose author David Slaughter proposes the following :- [There is a spoken remnant of history about Cissa the Saxon's family, which survived locally, relating that his son Winchel or his followers the Wincheling founded Winchelsea. The writer believes this remnant to be true and that the first settlement must have been established by Wine Cissing, the original form of the town's name having been 'Wines cesel ie' and that the present name of Winchelsea developed from this Old English form.]

Winchelsea Beach Old Winchelsea, originally known as Wincles eg (Winkle Island) , was found on an island between what is now known as Rye Harbour and Winchelsea Beach . The holiday resort of Winchelsea Beach is a modern settlement probably lying where the Old Winchelsea was found.
An extract of the Nothgyth Quest whose author David Slaughter proposes the following :- [There is a spoken remnant of history about Cissa the Saxon's family, which survived locally, relating that his son Winchel or his followers the Wincheling founded Winchelsea. The writer believes this remnant to be true and that the first settlement must have been established by Wine Cissing, the original form of the town's name having been 'Wines cesel ie' and that the present name of Winchelsea developed from this Old English form.]



Windmill Hill This village derivation is still being researched


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